“Padyak! Padyak!”

Kuya Boy is a personification of the words dignity of labor. He takes pride in his being a 'padyak' driver for more than a decade; a 'profession' that allowed him to send all his children to school--two just finished college.  More than the stories he reveled me with, my attention was caught with his declaration: "Two years na lang pensionado na ako."  Seeing the puzzled look on my face, he added, "... naga-voluntary contribution ako sa SSS, kaya pwede na ako mag-pension. Pahinga na ako sa 'padyak'." My heart was filled with pride for him. Finally, he'll be able to enjoy the fruits of his labor.

Kuya Boy is a personification of the words dignity of labor. He takes pride in his being a ‘padyak’ driver for more than a decade; a ‘profession’ that allowed him to send all his children to school–two just finished college.
More than the stories he reveled me with, my attention was caught with his declaration: “Two years na lang pensionado na ako.”
Seeing the puzzled look on my face, he added, “… naga-voluntary contribution ako sa SSS, kaya pwede na ako mag-pension. Pahinga na ako sa ‘padyak’.”
My heart was filled with pride for him. Finally, he’ll be able to enjoy the fruits of his labor.

“Padyak! Padyak, sir?” He asked every passerby, always smiling regardless of the countless silent rejections–white teeth bared in a hearty grin, widening his eyes, nodding to the curious contraption where he’s enthroned.

“Padyak! Padyak, mam?” Shouting the same words everyone around him does–surrounded by many like him–he was relentless, unwavering in his determination to land one, even just a single fare. He met each wandering gaze and waved as if to a long-lost friend, ignoring the thirst and hunger wracking his being for hours now. Inhaling the poison fumes of cars and buses rippling in the midday sun, he wiped the sweat from his forehead, as the sun mercilessly broils everything underneath it.

“Padyak! Padyak!” How many years have you stood here and sought the fares of tourists like me? He is about fifty, his smiling face masking all traces of hardships and strife, yet his slender frame betrayed him. I know, driving a “padyak” is not a quick route to a full dinner table.

“Padyak, sir?” He smiled… not with his mouth. With his eyes. His eyes. They bared his soul at me that very instance. They mirrored a persistent dream where passengers beg him for a ride, as he proudly surveys a long line of ‘padyak’–all his–queuing for fares along Rizal Street, one of Tabaco City, Albay’s main thoroughfares; his ‘fleet’ bringing in limitless wealth, filling his coffers with mounds of coins for his wife and children…

“Sakay ka na, sir.” He smiled again.

I gave in.

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About Seeing with Brahmin eyes
My sense of humor can be keen, sarcastic, silly or corny -- sometimes all at once. I enjoy meeting new people with no preconceived ideas about what or what is not possible. You get much more out of life by being open minded and willing. I'm an easy going, good-natured person who loves life and loves people. I'm both optimistic and realistic and pretty objective when it comes to assessing situations, events, etc. In general I am a very positive person and you'll usually find we with a smile on my face.

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